2014-10-31 | Workshop "Trust in the Age of Data (big or small)"

publicado a la‎(s)‎ 25 ago. 2014 4:24 por Lola Fernández Santos   [ actualizado el 19 nov. 2014 4:53 ]


"Trust in the Age of Data (big or small)"

https://www.asis.org/asist2014/seminars_workshops_Information_Policy.html

 

Date: October 31, 2014 (Friday)

Time: 9:00am to 5:00pm

Location: Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Seattle, WA, USA

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:

 

We plan this workshop as an interactive event focused around the scholarship of trust. This is an opportunity for scholars to fine-tune position papers and works-in-progress as they are informed via the workshop discussions and activities, and brainstorm about methodological approaches to studying trust in the context of government and corporate use of big data, emerging technologies, and globalized infrastructures. Participants who do not present a work-in-progress or position paper, but are in attendance as a general workshop participant, will have the opportunity to further develop ideas and interests that are related to information policy, ethics, and trust.

 

This workshop will enable participants to engage, challenge, support, and encourage each other on questions such as: the importance of trust; theorizing the concept of trust; conceptualizing trust around a set of relationships; understanding trust in the relationship between citizens and the state; reconciling trust with NSA (and other agency) surveillance; trust in international or intra-national state to state relationships; and trust in other communities, including between and among dominant and underrepresented groups in society.

 

We will address questions such as:

       How are researchers conceptualizing trust in the age of data? 

       How can scholars investigate infrastructures of trust?

       Are understandings of trust shifting? If so, with what consequences, in which contexts?

       When is trust justified? When is it not justified? Should decision-makers focus on and build trustworthiness rather than (mere) trust?

       What are the economic, political and legal implications of trust in the age of data (big and small)?

       How does policy design build/undermine trust?

       What are the ethics of trust in the age of data?

 

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from across the information science fields (LIS, Archives, Museums, HCI, Law, Policy) to lend their respective lens’s to a critical exploration of trust.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION:

All interested researchers, graduate students, and information professionals are invited to submit a proposal for:

1) works-in-progress research papers,

2) short position statements and/or short information policy/trust scenarios (e.g., critical reflection on policies already in place or developing new policy),

3) abstracts describing possible existing or novel methodological approaches to researching the relationships between data and trust in a range of contexts.

IMPORTANT DATES:

September 1, 2014: Submission due date for extended abstracts or position papers

September 20, 2014: Notification of acceptance

October 15, 2014: Submit presentations (drafts, outlines, slides, etc.)

REGISTRATION FEES:

https://www.asis.org/asist2014/seminars_workshops_Information_Policy.html

Fees

Early-bird:  SIG/IFP or SIG/III Members $190, Members $200, Non-members $220

Regular:  SIG/IFP or SIG/III Members $210, Members $220, Non-members $240

 

The registration fee will cover workshop costs, wireless Internet access, lunch and coffee breaks.

WORKSHOP PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS:

 

Kristene Unsworth, Drexel University; Lisa P. Nathan, University of British Columbia; Alan Rubel, University of Wisconsin; Bryce Clayton Newell, University of Washington; Nadia Caidi, University of Toronto; Elizabeth Shaffer, University of British Columbia; Adam D. Moore, University of Washington; Heather MacNeil, University of Toronto

 

Please forward any questions that you have to Kris Unsworth (unsworth@drexel.edu) or Bryce Newell (bcnewell@uw.edu).

Kristene Unsworth

2014 SIG-IFP chair

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